Penn State Abington

BA in Art Curriculum



Art Home
 

|  Choosing a Major in Art | APPLY

    Program Vision 

|  Accreditation | Facilities

BA in Art
 

|  Curriculum | Prescribed Courses | Media Concentrations

Gallery
 

|  Drawing+Painting | Print | Sculpture | Ceramics | newMedia    

Enrichment
 

|  Exhibitions | Visiting Artists | Publications | Study Abroad

Students
 

|  Scholarships | Fellowships | Internships | Art Club

Faculty 
 

|  Alumni  |  Affiliations


ON THIS PAGE...

 

 Curriculum Chart | Academic Plan | Course Rollout | Learning Objectives | Assessment | Pedagogy

 


 

Curriculum Chart

 

Click on the image below to explore the official Curriculum Chart for the ARTAB Degree (Bachelor of Arts in Art at Penn State Abington). This chart is a handy visualization of prerequisite tracks and concentrations described in the University Bulletin (the "Blue Book"). Note: This chart is updated and modified periodically. Use it in consultation with your academic advisor.

 

CURRICULUM CHART

 

Click here for a printable version of the Curriculum Chart

 

↑ return to top

 


 

ARTAB Academic Plan

 

The official Academic Plan for the ARTAB Degree (Bachelor of Arts in Art at Penn State Abington). Note: This table is updated and modified periodically. Use it in consultation with your academic advisor.

 

Semester 1

 Credits 

Semester 2

 Credits 

  ART 110S Ideas as Visual Images

3

  ART 111 Ideas as Objects

3

  ART H 111 (GA) (IL)
  Ancient to Medieval Art

3

  ART H 112 (GA) (IL)
  Renaissance to Modern Art

3

  ENGL 015 or 030 (GWS)
  Composition/Honors Composition

3

  ART 122Y
  Commentary on Art

3

  Quantification (GQ)

3

  Quantification (GQ)

3

  Foreign Language

4

  Foreign Language

4

Total Credits: 

16

Total Credits: 

16

Semester 3

Credits

Semester 4

Credits

  ART 200-level Studio

3

  ART 200-level Studio

3

  ART 200-level Studio

3

  ART 200-level Studio

3

  ART H

3

  Natural Science (GN)

3

  Social/Behavioral Sciences (GS)

3

  Social/Behavioral Sciences (GS)

3

  Foreign Language

4

  Humanities (GH)

3

Total Credits: 

16

Total Credits: 

15

Semester 5

Credits

Semester 6

Credits

  ART 200-level Studio

3

  ART 300/400-level Studio (Conc)

4

  ART H

3

  ART 300/400-level Studio (Conc)

3

  Humanities (GH)

3

  Natural Science (GN)

3

  CAS 100 (GWS) Effective Speech

3

  ENGL 202 (GWS) Effective Writing

3

  B.A. Knowledge Domain

3

 

 

Total Credits: 

15

Total Credits: 

13

Semester 7

Credits

Semester 8

Credits

  ART 300/400-level Studio

4

  ART 300/400-level Studio

4

  Natural Science (GN)

3

  Elective

3

  B.A. Requirement Other Cultures

3

  Elective

3

  B.A. Knowledge Domain

3

  B.A. Knowledge Domain

3

  Health and Physical Activity (GHA)

1.5

  Health and Physical Activity (GHA)

1.5

Total Credits: 

14.5

Total Credits: 

14.5

 

  • Bold type indicates courses requiring a quality grade of C or better.
  • Italics indicate courses that satisfy both major and General Education requirements.
  • Bold Italics indicate courses requiring a quality grade of C or better and that satisfy both major and General Education requirements.
  • (Conc) indicates a media concentration studio.
  • GWS, GHA, GQ, GN, GA, GH, and GS are codes used to identify General Education requirements.
  • US, IL, and US;IL are codes used to designate courses that satisfy University United States/International Cultures requirements.
  • Y is the code used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirements and United States/International Cultures requirements.
  • Note: Many intermediate and advanced art studio courses are repeatable.


Change of Major Requirements: A minimum grade point average of 2.0 and a successful portfolio review are required to enter the major.

 

Click here for a printable version of the Academic Plan

 

↑ return to top

 


 

Course Rollout

 

Click on the table below to explore the official Course Rollout for the ARTAB Degree (Bachelor of Arts in Art at Penn State Abington). This timetable shows anticipated course offerings over the coming years. Students may use this to plan semesters in which they may take courses, especially those that might be offered only once or twice during their residency. Note: This table is updated and modified periodically. Use it in consultation with your academic advisor.

 

COURSE ROLLOUT

 

Click here for a printable version of the Course Rollout

 

↑ return to top

 

 


 

Learning Objectives

 

The B.A. in Art curriculum is built to help candidates for the degree attain critical learning objectives. Upon graduation from the Abington College Art Program, a student should be able to demonstrate…

 

Visual Literacy

  • By recalling, understanding and applying basic visual elements and principals of visual design across two-, three- and four-dimensional media expressions.
  • By using a variety of media to develop an articulate, unique visual expression of the world as it is actually seen, abandoning iconic visual classifications and symbolic stereotypes.

 

Craft

  • By mastering tools used in traditional and contemporary art and design making contexts, with particular emphasis on a chosen media concentration: Drawing and Painting, Printmaking, Sculpture, Ceramics or New Media.
  • By making intelligent media application decisions to achieve appropriate form in support of intended content.

 

Research

  • By recalling, understanding, applying and analyzing art history, aesthetic theory, contemporary topics and a liberal arts framework as components of the creative process, all used as foundation for deep, methodical study of the subject of creative investigation.
  • By employing a vocabulary of spoken and written word to clearly express the relevance, motivation and discoveries of the research.

 

Creative and Critical Thinking

  • By synthesizing and evaluating creative output, contributing to critical discourse, responding positively to feedback and understanding how to use critique as part of the creative process.
  • By experimenting with and expanding the use of media with an eye toward future possibilities not prescribed by current standards.

 

Vision

  • By creating original, conceptually compelling works of art or design relevant to individual experience and using a personal visual vocabulary.
  • By creating work that evokes a personally meaningful intellectual and emotional response to a zone of personal concern.

 

Communication

  • By creating work which evokes a spectator’s response that resonates with, without necessarily duplicating, the artist’s personal response, understanding through discussion and critique how a spectator arrives at a particular inspiration interacting with one’s work.
  • By planning and implementing exhibitions of work, understanding the process from curatorial conceptualization through promotion, preparation and physical installation.
  • By creating and maintaining ongoing documentation of work through portfolio, resume, website and other visual and verbal means of communicating professional development.

 

Professionalism

  • By understanding how art making relates to aspirations for career, further study at the graduate level, or personal growth.
  • By understanding the ethical and professional responsibilities of an artist or designer.

 

↑ return to top

 


 

Assessment of Learning Objectives

 

Various criteria are used to collect and evaluate evidence that students are meeting learning objectives. Certain of these criteria are easily quantifiable and measurable. However, with respect to the individualized and emotional nature of art inquiry, many of these require a quantitative expression of a qualitative evaluation. 

Concept

Critical qualitative evaluation of:

  • Meaningful content in the work.
  • Emotional component of the work.
  • Intellectual component of the work.

 

Execution

Critical qualitative evaluation of:

  • Craftsmanship and production of work.
  • Relationship between content and form.
  • Breadth and depth of media exploration.

 

Participation

As appropriate, quantitative or qualitative evaluation of:

  • Attendance and promptness.
  • Adherence to the PSU Student Code of Conduct.
  • Adherence to the Abington College Academic Integrity Policy.
  • Adequacy of work done outside of class.
  • Adequacy of research in preparation for work.
  • Preparedness for work in and out of class.
  • Use of a journal to generate, develop and document working process.
  • Use of critical language in critiques, written assignments and journal.
  • Ability to receive feedback in critiques and give useful responses to classmates.
  • Exhibition of work in various environments.

 

Grading

Based on these criteria, grades translate a qualitative assessment to a measurable assessment as follows:

  • A – Outstanding work exceeding basic project requirements, demonstrating profound insight and a thorough understanding of course material.
  • B – Very good work exceeding basic project requirements, demonstrating complete understanding of material.
  • C – Satisfactory work meeting basic project requirements, demonstrating good understanding of material.
  • D – Adequate work meeting basic project requirements, demonstrating some understanding of material.
  • F – Inadequate work failing to meet project requirements, demonstrating poor understanding of material.

 

↑ return to top

 


 

Pedagogy

 

Courses in the program satisfy graduation requirements for three groups: the general academic community, those preparing to major in art, and art majors. Courses tailored to these groups include:

  • Studios exploring a range of Media Concentrations
  • Foundation studies for the pre-major
  • Critical Studies exploring the relationships between art, culture and history
  • Special Topics and Study Abroad opportunities
  • General Education courses

 

Course codes for Art (ART), Art History (ART H) and Photography (PHOTO) indicate specific disciplines, while the level of the course is designated by a number which generally indicates the status of the student the course is designed for.

 

Non-Major (General Education) Status

  • 000 Level – Introductory courses tailored for general education purposes. As students learn to create artworks, they also gain understanding and appreciation of the relationship of art to their various academic studies, to contemporary society, and to their personal lives. Though designed primarily for general study, these courses often inspire students to pursue art as a major. They include art appreciation along with introductory studios for drawing and painting, sculpture, and ceramics. Certain courses in the 100 and 200 level for photography and newMedia are also open for general arts (GA) fulfillment. 
  • Art majors should be aware that any course with a 000 Level cannot be used to fulfill any requirement for the major, including general arts (GA) requirement. If taken, these courses will be placed as an elective in the degree audit.

 

Pre-Major (ABHSS) Status

  • 100 Level – Introductory courses serving as Foundation for the major, including the exploration of two- and three-dimensional visual elements and design principles, along with Critical Studies.
  • 200 Level – Beginning courses exploring specific media in drawing and painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics and new media. Topics in Critical Studies and Photography may also be explored in greater depth. Students experience a range of media to determine their interest in a specific concentration. Study Abroad and Special Topics courses are also available in this status.

 

Major (ARTAB) Status

  • 300 Level – Intermediate courses specific to media, including higher level technique and theory in preparation for advanced courses. Art History electives are also available at this level.
  • 400 Level – Advanced courses specific to media, including student-directed projects and advanced technique and theory in preparation for graduate or professional level work. Independent study, internship, study abroad and special topics opportunities exist at this level.

 

Methodologies

Teaching methodologies used in Art Program courses can include any of the following, and are often found in combination:

  • Lectures, Readings and Discussions – Particularly in Critical Studies courses, but permeating studios as well, are lecture and online presentations, group discussions and written analysis and reflections on traditional and contemporary artists and art practice.
  • Demonstrations and Workshops – Art making processes are explained and demonstrated in studio and, particularly in new media, through online wiki and video tutorial. These processes are expanded on through individual instruction during studio, after which work is done outside of class time responding to this instruction to fulfill course assignments.
  • Critique – Instructors moderate student group exchange of thoughts, feelings and responses to the creative work of their peers, leading to a deeper understanding of one’s progress, intentions and future direction.
  • Exhibition – Students exhibit work in public venues including general exhibitions, student-curated exhibitions and a senior capstone exhibition. Student work is also exhibited online via the program website and, particularly in new media and study abroad, course and student blogs.
  • Publication and Research – Students have opportunities to engage in publication (Abington Review) and research activities (ACURA).
  • Internships and Study Abroad – These special opportunities expand beyond traditional coursework into the world outside of campus.

 

↑ return to top