Rachael Brown

Lecturer; Pre-Doctoral Fellow, American Studies
Office Phone: 215-881-7527
Office Location: Sutherland, 221b

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Bio

Rachael Brown is a lecturer in American Studies and English Literature at Penn State Abington, and has been an instructor in the same at Penn State Harrisburg. An Americanist from the periphery, her first book project hinges on the intersection of Transnationalism, Women’s Studies, and World Religions in Global Politics, a multi-pronged and multi-genre analysis.

She is also a contributor to the field of Tourism and Leisure Studies, focusing on early American Travel Literature as a proponent of modern myths. Brown is currently All But Dissertated in the American Studies doctoral program at Penn State Harrisburg, where she has been a Robert W. Graham Endowed Fellow. Further, Brown’s publications encompass the field of Community Psychology and Social Change, her masters program at the same campus, during which she held a Graduate Research Assistantship as well as the Harrisburg Scholarship.

Brown is an alumna of Messiah College, where she held the President’s Scholarship and Provost’s Scholarship, as an honor student majoring in Psychology and minoring in Philosophy. She has a multi-lingual background with an unusually broad range of international and intercultural experience.

Courses Designed:

  • AMST 160 Introduction to Asian American Studies
  • AMST/ENG 135 Alternative Voices in American Literature (Middle Eastern, Eurasian Influences)
  • AMST 105/ENG 105 American Popular Culture - Geopolitical Graphic Novels
  • AMST 100 Introduction to American Studies: U.S. Cultures of Travel
  • AMST 100 Introduction to American Studies: The American Dream in a Transnational Era
  • AMST 100 Introduction to American Studies: Expansionist Memoirs
  • AMST 100 Introduction to American Studies: The United States and the Caribbean
Research Interests
Gender in Geopolitical Conflict
Epistemology & National Meta-Narrative
Empire, Acculturation, & Remote Enculturation
World Religions in American Popular Culture
Missionaries & Manifest Destiny
Sociolinguistics & Social Power